fun & funky cardio high intensity workout (7 min HIIT training)

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Exercise can and should be fun, so I took it up 1000 notches and created a car themed high intensity cardio workout with easy-to-follow dance moves. Each exercise is performed for 30 seconds. This fun and funky workout will get your heart rate up and make you laugh, at the same time. If you have knee pain or problems, keep your feet on the ground.

Below is a list of the HIIT exercises in this 7-minute cardiovascular workout, in order:

1. trucker driver: shake hips while turning the steering wheel

2. sunroof dancing: as if you’re standing in a limo on prom night

3. honk the horn with two side-steps

4. low rider: curtsy lunge pulses

5. windshield wipers: bunny hops with hands in the air

6 stick shift: step forward and back with arm moving forward & back

7. put on your seatbelt: bring arm up and across the body

8. roll down both windows: imaginary jump rope

9. back up the car: hop backwards in a square

10. wax on, wax off: up & down squats with rotating hands

11. near miss: chest press with leg lifts

12. push the car: running man dance with chest press

13. roadside assistance: jumping jacks

14. fast feet

At the end of the video, my husband shows up as the tow truck and whisks me away.

 

P.S. This is my 885th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

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Push-Pull-Press beginner workout

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If you’re wondering what the heck is a push-pull-press workout, you’re not the only one. Any exercise where you push something away, whether it’s the floor or a weight, that’s a push exercise.

shoulder press (press exercise)

Examples of push exercises include push-ups, squats, upward dog, cobra pose, calf raises, and leg presses. Squats are often listed under the “legs” category.

A press exercise is usually where you are pressing overhead, like a shoulder press with dumbbells or a barbell, but sometimes press and push exercises are considered the same thing.

A pull exercise is where you are pulling a weight, a cable or a band towards you or upwards. Examples of pull exercises are pull-ups, band pull-aparts, lat pull-downs, upright rows, rope pull-downs, flyes, lateral raises (shoulder), deadlifts, seated rows, and bent-over rows. Deadlifts are sometimes listed under the “legs” category (ie: push-pull-legs).

goblet squat (legs/push exercise)

In this push-pull-press beginner weightlifting workout, we do one set of six exercises, which include goblet squats, which are easier for beginners to master, shoulder press with dumbbells, double-leg deadlifts with a kettlebell or dumbbells, bent-over rows with a dumbbell or kettlebell, and end the strength section with calf raises.

push-ups (this is a press/push exercise)

Beginners should always start with one set of exercises. People who are more experienced should do two sets. Advanced lifters should do three or four sets of exercises.

double-leg kettlebell deadlift (this is a legs/pulling exercise)

You’ll want two sets of dumbbells for this 20 minute workout, and if you have a kettlebell, grab that too.

Don’t worry if you are brand new to lifting or exercise, I go over form and show different variations, depending on what level your are at, so you can pick the one that best suits you.

Here are the exercises in order:

1. warm-up with side steps

2. push-ups to failure

3. goblet squats

4. shoulder press

5. kettlebell deadlifts

6. rows

7. 3-way calf raises

end with stretches

Press the play button on the 20 minute YouTube video below to start this fun and funny workout (my husband incorporates dance moves and laughable expressions behind my back, in between sets).

P.S. This is my 878th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

side butt butt workout (gluteus medius) to get rid of hip dips

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This side butt workout is designed to strengthen the glute medius and reduce the appearance of hip dips, where there is an indentation on your hips.

All you need for this workout is a mat and a glute band, what I refer to as a “booty band.”

Here are the exercises that target the hips/side-butt, in order:

  • 20 side steps (this your warmup)
  • 10 mini squats with side leg lifts
  • 10 hip cleaners
  • 10 leg lifts to the back at a 45-degree angle, each side
  • 10 clamshells, each side
  • 10 side-lying hip raises with a kick, each side
  • 10 seated banded hip abduction
  • 10 side-lying leg raises, toe up, each side
  • 10 supine banded hip abductions
  • End with a glute stretch

The appearance of hip dips is largely determined by your anatomy, your genes, but you can add volume to that area by adding muscle and/or fat. You can add exercises that strengthen the glute medius (what people sometimes refer to the side butt) to build muscle onto your gluteus medius (although, you’re most likely adding muscle to all areas of your glutes since exercise works multiple muscles).

The thinner you are, the more likely you’ll see hip dips, but the good news is that most guys don’t even notice hip dips. Just focus on getting stronger and being the healthiest you can.

One way to improve your health and reduce excess bodyfat, is to reduce saturated fat intake by limiting or eliminating dairy, meat, chicken, fish and oils. If that’s something you’re interested in, stay tuned for the 2nd edition of my book The High-Five Diet, coming soon.

Click the play button on the YouTube video below to start the 15 minute workout.

P.S. This is my 883rd blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

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Shoulder Mobility Workout (frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis/rehab)

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This shoulder mobility workout is to help you regain range of motion and strength. You can use these 12 exercises for rehabilitation for frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis too. You’ll need light dumbbells and a light TheraBand. This complete workout takes only 30 minutes.

plank works shoulders and core

Your goal is to perform 3 sets of 15 reps, three times a week, taking a day off between each shoulder workout session. Stop at the first sign of pain. The mantras “feel the burn,” and “no pain, no gain” don’t apply when you’re injured, or are rehabbing from an injury. Doing too much too soon, can backfire, especially when it comes to shoulder exercises and stretches.

Here are the shoulder rehab and strength exercises in this workout, in order:

  1. Shoulder rolls (this is the warm-up)
  2. Rows to work the upper back muscles (no equipment needed)
  3. Front raise
  4. Imaginary rope pull-down
  5. TheraBand Chest press
  6. TheraBand pull-aparts
  7. scarecrows
  8. external rotations (use a band or weights)
  9. tap back of each hand against the lower back, hips or glutes (this is an internal shoulder mobility exercise)
  10. lateral raise with a large band on trap (You only need to add the band if your trap raises and takes over. You can order this same blue band from NT Loop from http://www.ntloop.com/shop/ )
  11. pec stretch
  12. plank hold (this works the core and your shoulders
    • other options:
    • plank with shoulder taps
    • quadruped with shoulder taps
    • plank, go on all fours (quadruped position) for scapular presses and/or scapular rotations

Start your rehab now, by pressing play on the YouTube videos below (scroll down to see the other videos and my tip for comfortable sleeping):

Another exercise that you may want to try when your shoulders get a little bit stronger are ball-walkouts. You’ll need a Swiss Ball to do these. This is one of the exercises my coach had me perform to rehabilitate my shoulders:

This is a short video on how to use a foam roller and a yoga therapy ball (you can use a tennis ball too) to get rid of knots, release tight fascia, and increase shoulder mobility

This is another short video for some extra shoulder stretches:

How to sleep with a frozen shoulder:

Try to sleep on your back with a special pillow that has a hole in the middle so that your chin isn’t dipping down and putting your cervical spine in an awkward position. You don’t want to sleep on the side of your injured shoulder because that will intensify the pain. You also don’t want to sleep on the side that’s not injured because that shoulder will have too much pressure on it, and your good shoulder may end up hurting too. Another reason why you don’t want to sleep on just one side is that your face will be compressed, and, over time, one side of your face will age quicker than the other, because the side of your face that’s on the pillow will be wrinkled and pulled.

P.S. This is my 878th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

Hip thrust workout (full butt workout)

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If you want to burn more calories, stop back aches, get rid of hip pain, and have a better looking physique, exercising your glutes (the side butt and glute max), is a quick and easy fix. A ten-to-fifteen minute workout, two to three times a week is sufficient to get your glutes strong and functional.

I’ve included eight glute exercises that take no more than 10 minutes to complete below. You can follow me in the YouTube video in this blog post, or do them on your own from the written workout provided.

In this hip thrust workout, we are working the gluteus maximus and the gluteus medius, what some people refer to as the side butt, by adding a resistance band to some of the exercises.

For this workout, you can use a soft foam roller like I’m using, a Bosu ball, or your couch to elevate your upper body. If you have a resistance band, grab that too.

Here are the exercises in this workout, in order:

  • 10 upright kneeling hip thrusts
  • 10 banded hip thrusts
banded hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 20 B-stance hip thrusts
B-stance hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 20 single leg hip thrusts
single leg hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 10 alternating marches
  • 10 banded hip thrusts, with a pause at the top
hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 10 banded quick hip thrusts
  • 10 banded hip thrusts with a 10 second hold on the last rep

End with a 30-second glute stretch. If you have a foam roller, use the roller to add pressure to the hips, and any place that feels tight or knotted. Make sure not to foam roll over joints, your neck or your low back.

If you followed along with me, you did over 100 hip thrusts, great job!

Play the 10-minute hip thrust workout below to strengthen those glutes today:

P.S. This is my 880th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

100 Hip Thrust Workout (8 variations)

  1. 10 upright kneeling hip thrusts
  2. 10 banded hip thrusts
  3. 20 B-stance hip thrusts
  4. 20 single leg hip thrusts
  5. 10 alternating marches
  6. 10 banded hip thrusts, with a pause at the top
  7. 10 banded quick hip thrusts
  8. 10 banded hip thrusts with a 10 second hold on the last rep

how to get motivated to exercise (15 motivating tips)

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Getting motivated to exercise, starts before you go for a walk or lift weights.

Motivation stems from planning, being positive, acknowledging the benefits of the exercises you plan to do and that you’re not going to be perfect at every one of them.

By telling yourself that you’re going to give your next workout your best, that you may not like all of the exercises, but that you’ll have fun doing the ones you do enjoy, will help motivate you to start and complete the workout.

Going to bed a little earlier to get a little more sleep may be all that’s needed for that energy boost.

If you feel exhausted daily, start with a walk. Sometimes exercise will give you the energy you need, because moving around feels invigorating.

What foods you eat, and what drinks you consume, also factor into whether you’ll feel up to exercising.

Drinking alcoholic beverages the previous day will definitely tax your energy level and will make you feel like sleeping instead of moving.

If you eat a heavy meal before exercise, you’re not going to want to jump up and down, or do abdominal work. If your body requires to you to eat before exercising, choose something light, such as a fruit smoothie, or some fruit.

Fruit is an excellent pre-workout food because it’s low in calories, won’t upset your stomach, and the healthy carbs from fruit will give you an immediate source of glucose your muscles need.

Photo by Jane D. on Pexels.com

Simple things like putting on a comfortable exercise outfit that makes you feel good and look good, planning your workout in advance by picking the exercises, how many of each exercise you plan to do, putting the days you plan to workout on your calendar, deciding the start and end times of your workouts, choosing your favorite music or creating a playlist, are surefire ways to motivate you so you’re looking forward to exercising.

Top 15 tips to get motivated to exercise

  1. be positive
  2. acknowledge the benefits of exercise you plan to do
  3. understand that you’re not going to be perfect at every exercise
  4. tell yourself that you’re going to give your next workout your best
  5. you may not like all of the exercises, but you’ll love the results
  6. go to bed a little earlier to get a little more sleep
  7. avoid drinking alcoholic beverages the previous day
  8. don’t eat a heavy meal before exercise
  9. eat a light snack, such as a fruit smoothie, or some fruit, pre-workout
  10. put on a comfortable exercise outfit that makes you feel good and look good
  11. plan your workout in advance by picking the exercises
  12. decide in advance, how many of each exercise you plan to do by writing it down
  13. put the days you plan to workout on your calendar
  14. decide the start and end times of your workouts in advance
  15. choose your favorite music or create a playlist

 
Before COVID-19, before the lockdown, I went to the gym every day, not only because I worked there as a personal trainer, or because the gym has a lot more equipment than I do, but because it was fun. I got to speak to other people (and gym rats like me), see what other exercises that they do, and for that extra motivation of being in that loud, energizing environment. I created a video with invigorating music that will create that similar vibe to motivate you while you work out, to help push you a little harder, work out a little longer, lift a little heavier, and to try new exercises.

This video I put together contains over 80 clips of exercises I’ve performed, either at the gym, my yard, or my home gym, with upbeat music. You can walk and watch, or do whatever workout routine you want to the music, while feeling like you’re around, or with your top trainer, or gym buddy in your favorite fitness environment.

Here’s a partial list of the exercises shown in the video:

Play the above video to watch these exercises

 

Handing abdominal exercises

Hip thrusts on a Bosu ball with a single 70-lb dumbbell at Crunch Gym

Walking planks with chains

Single leg hip thrusts on a bench

Barbell overhead shrugs with 40-lbs

Squats with a 100-lb dumbbell (that’s about what I weigh!)

Never-ending squats

Wall-sit with four 35-pound plates totaling 140 pounds

Chest press on a pull-up machine’s foot pedal

Bent-over rows on a bench, back when it was World Gym

Push-ups on kettlebells

Lat pull downs

Side elbow plank while holding a swiss ball in between by feet

Static lunges with a plate under my heel while holding a heavy dumbbell in one hand

Side-leg lifts

Banded clamshells

Mixed grip sumo barbell deadlifts

Kneeling hip thrusts

Banded kickbacks

Heel-elevated goblet squats

Heels-elevated prisoner squats

Heels-elevated overhead squats

Single-leg glute bridge

Alternating, elevated banded glute marches

Kettlebell swings

Kettlebell deadlifts

Single-leg kettlebell deadlifts

Standing quad stretch

Standing hamstring stretch

Jump squats

rolling planks

side plank with hip lifts

swiss ball hamstring curls

foam roller hamstring curls

front and side step-ups

neutral grip pull-ups

pull ups from the floor

front and rear leg elevated lunges

push-ups on yoga blocks

dips on pull-up machine

skater squats

Bulgarian split squats

Lateral raises

Bent-arm lateral raises

Calf raises

Plie squats

Play the YouTube video above so see these exercises done properly with upbeat music.

Let me know what you think

P.S. This is my 879th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

upper body light weights workout (how to tone arms, triceps, biceps, chest & back)

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If you want toned arms, a beautiful chest pump, strong rounded shoulders, and a no-fat back, no amount of cardio will help these areas; what you need is weight training. You don’t need heavy weights to strengthen your muscles, but you do need to challenge your body with twice-weekly weightlifting exercises, to keep your bones and muscles from deteriorating.

I created an upper body workout, where all you need is light weights. This follow-along workout is for all levels (newbies, intermediate and even advanced) because the exercises aren’t complicated, and you pick the weights.

If you’re new to weightlifting, 3-pound and 5-pound weights will suffice, for now.

If you’ve been weightlifting for 6 months consistently, 5-pound and 8-pound weights will work great.

If you’re an experienced weightlifter, have three sets of weights available for different body parts, and for drops sets. You’ll want 8-pound weights, 10-pound weights and 12-pound weights.

Here are the exercises in this workout, in order:

  1. walking warm up with bodyweight chest press and shoulder presses
walking warm-up with bodyweight chest press

2. bridge with dumbbell chest press

bridge with dumbbell chest press

3. kneeling dumbbell rows

4. bridge with dumbbell chest flys

5. dumbbell plank rows

dumbbell plank rows

6. bridge with dumbbell fly and press

7. kneeling dumbbell triceps extensions

8. dumbbell hammer curls & bent-arm lateral raise

9. dumbbell scarecrows

beginning position of dumbbell scarecrows

10. dumbbell shoulder press

kneeling shoulder press

11. dumbbell hammer curl, bent-arm lateral raise, scarecrow, shoulder press combination

12. bird-dog

bird-dog pose

Stretches: triceps stretch, chest stretch, biceps stretch, latissimus stretch

Play the upper body workout below to strengthen your triceps, back, chest, biceps and core muscles.

P.S. This is my 879th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

5-minute low-impact power walk (to boost energy)

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Walking is an easy way to lower blood sugar, burn calories, lower cholesterol, improve your mood and elevate your heart rate.

I created a quick five-minute, fast-paced, low-impact walking workout to raise your heart rate, and give you an immediate energy boost. There are 10 exercises, in addition to a short warm-up, in 30 second rounds. Here are the exercises, in order:

warm-up: march in place

1. imaginary jump rope

2. walk side-to-side with pec dec press

3. wide march with alternating upper cuts

4. walk side-to-side with lateral-to-front raises

5. walk forward two steps, knee raise, walk backwards two steps with a knee raise

6. wide march with triceps kickbacks + narrow march with shoulder press

7. narrow march with knee twists

8. calf raise with a shoulder press, with a wide march

9. alternating punches with a reverse tap

10. butt-kicks with heel taps

The workout ends with a brief quad stretch and a hamstring stretch.

Answers to frequently asked questions about walking can be found below the walking workout video.

P.S. This is my 878th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions

Is power walking a good workout? Power walking is considered a good workout because it requires more energy than a standard walk, because power walking is fast-paced, and you’ll burn more calories.

Can you lose weight with power walking at home? You can lose weight and drop pounds and inches with power walking if done consistently. If you walk just once a week, you won’t see any weight loss, but you may see some strength gains. If you power walk twice a week, you may see some weight loss, but not much. You’ll see the most weight loss and strength benefits of power walking if you perform power walking at least 30-minutes three to five times per week.

How many times a week should I power walk? If you don’t perform any other forms of exercise, you should perform at least 30-minutes of power walking, six days a week

What are good workout videos on YouTube? There’s lots of good workout videos on YouTube that you don’t have to pay a fee to see, but it would depend on what type of workouts you like to do. If you like a slow-paced beginner yoga flow, follow Yoga with Adriene. If you like low-impact, fairly easy walking videos, check out Walk at Home. If you like ballet, Kathryn Morgan has ballet videos for all levels. If you like to be surprised with a variety of workouts, from glute workouts, TRX, barre, plyometric, TheraBand, kettlebell, to weight lifting, for at all levels of fitness, check out Nina’s Nutrition and Exercise videos

What are the best indoor walking weight loss workout videos? Leslie Sansone with Walk at Home has the best indoor walking videos because they are easy to follow, are mostly low-impact, and almost everyone at any age can follow them. If you like high energy walks with some dance moves, you can find Get Fit With Rick on YouTube. Another mention is, Nina’s Nutrition and Exercise Videos, which can also be found on YouTube, at no charge. She is a certified personal trainer, and strength and fitness coach, with a certification in fitness nutrition. She presently has two low-impact, walking workouts to music, one is a 5-minute power-walk, and the other is a 30-minute walking workout with the option of adding light hand weights. She has videos on weight loss, yoga, weight lifting, how to manage diabetes, nutrition, healthy recipes, and workouts for every body part on her YouTube channel.

How Not to Diet Cookbook by Dr Greger (Review: are the recipes any good?)

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I purchased the “How Not to Diet Cookbook” from Dr. Greger because the recipes don’t contain salt, sugar, oil or flour, are vegan, plant-based, and the most nutritious recipes you’ll find, but how do they taste? That’s what this post is about.

Here I cover topics such as: are the recipes any good, are they difficult to make, are they time consuming, and how do they taste?

(To see the photos of the recipes, play the YouTube video towards the bottom of this blog post)

vegan cheesy cauliflower potato bake with peas from the How Not to Diet Cookbook

The winning entrées I tried:

Cheesy Broccoli Soup. This is a delicious soup that’s vegan and rich and “cheesy.” Use five cups of store-bought broth instead of six. The only downside is that it’s high in fat from the cashews.

Cauliflower Alfredo Linguini with Roasted Asparagus. The sauce tasted like mashed potatoes, it was not thick and creamy like you would expect from an alfredo sauce. It was still a tasty meal, so I would recommend it and will probably make it again.

Brazil Nut Parm. This is a healthy remake of parmesan cheese, but with nutritional yeast, nuts & spices. This is my favorite recipe in the book after I added salt, oregano and cayenne. Use half of the nutritional yeast, and add your favorite spices and herbs.

Cheesy Cauliflower Potato Bake. This dish is a vegan take on mac-and-cheese. It was creamy and cheesy, but it needed a few improvements, and then it’s a winner. Omit the lemon juice, increase nutritional yeast to 1 cup, blend miso with the liquid before adding the rest of ingredients. Add peas, chopped cilantro, and diced red bell pepper.

Veggie Chirashi Bowls. This Japanese-inspired dish is good, if you add air-fried tofu, sliced red bell peppers, and don’t drain the miso sauce, otherwise, it won’t have any flavor.

The recipes I did not like:

Szechuan Tempeh and Broccoli. I love Chinese food so I thought I would enjoy this dish, and boy was I wrong! I’ve never tried tempeh before. Tempeh is a fermented soy product that’s firm on the outside and tastes like there’s crunchy seeds on the inside, which made it taste nothing like chicken or meat. Tempeh tastes like spoiled franken food. The dish has four steps and takes a lot of time and preparation. The sauce is bitter, nothing like the delicious salty-sweetness combination one expects from an Asian dish. There’s plenty of broccoli and tofu recipes on the web that are much better than this one!

Rich Roasted Vegetable Broth. This broth is supposed to be versatile so that it can be used in any dish, but the tomato paste was overpowering and the kombu gave the broth a fishy flavor, otherwise it was really plain. Buy store-broth instead.

Red Bean and Butternut Caldo Verde This entrée was plain and the broth tasted earthy. It might be good with a store-bought broth, a pinch of salt, coconut aminos, and maple syrup.

Southwest Kale Salad with Cumin-Tomato dressing. This salad was a flat-out awful! The dressing was bitter and tasted muddy. Just omit the dressing and top with a dollop of fresh guacamole, some mango chunks, and toasted, salted pepitas. If you don’t like kale, use another type of greens you like.

Red Bean and Arugula Salad with Mango Balsamic Dressing. In this odd salad, none of the flavors go together. I won’t be making this again.

Pasta with Pumpkin Sauce. This pasta dish with a pumpkin puree sauce was creamy, but bitter. This might be good with a few tablespoons of maple syrup to balance out the pumpkin’s bitterness

Portobellos and Spinach on Cauliflower Mash with Miso-Mushroom Sauce. This dish gets a big thumbs down. The cooked mushrooms tasted like slimy fungus. I don’t like mushrooms, but my husband does and he didn’t like this entrée either. In addition, the mash was grainy. If you add TVP, which is a dehydrated soy product, to the sauce and eliminate the mushrooms, it tastes like gravy (yum!). The only part of the dish that tastes good is the gravy, if you add TVP to it.

I made 12 of the recipes and only 5 of them tasted good and were worth making again, but with some changes. That means, over 50% of the recipes I made, I didn’t like. I don’t consider myself to be a picky eater, if the meal is healthy. The recipes contained numerous steps and were very time consuming.

If you decide to purchase this cookbook, my recommendations are to buy vegetable broth from the store, not only will this save you a lot of time, but the entrees will taste a lot more flavorful. Implement the improvements above to the recipes I made. You’ll also want to add a touch of salt, additional spices, some coconut aminos, and a little bit of maple syrup to many of the dishes.

To see the photos of some of the recipes from the How Not To Diet Cookbook, play the video below.

FAQ – frequently asked questions below

FAQ – frequently asked questions

Does not dieting have recipes? The How Not to Diet Cookbook has over 100 recipes, all of them vegan. Watch the YouTube video above to see what some of the recipes look like.

What exactly is plant based food? Plant-based food is unprocessed vegan food, which includes whole grains, greens, beans, peas, nuts, seeds, fruit and vegetables. Most processed foods are packaged, for example, nut butter and almond flour are processed because the nuts are ground up, your teeth and saliva are supposed to do that process, so all butters and flours are considered processed even if nothing else is added.

Can you eat peanut butter on a plant-based diet? Peanut butter is a plant-based food even though it’s slightly processed because the nuts have been ground up into a butter consistency. It’s better to eat the peanuts whole instead of as peanut butter. Make sure to choose nuts that don’t contain any oil, since oil is a saturated fat, causes inflammation, and is not a plant-based, green-light food.

Is Pasta OK on a plant-based diet? Pasta is considered by some, such as Dr. Greger, as okay on his plant-based diet, but I consider all pastas, except for zoodles, to be processed and not plant-based. Pasta is vegan, but not not truly plant-based. You can’t pick noodles off a tree or bush.

Can I eat eggs on a plant-based diet? Eggs are from poultry, which is an animal. Products that are made by animals, or from animals, are considered “meat” and are not plant-based and are not vegan. You should refrain from eating eggs on a plant-based diet.

Are potatoes considered plant based? Potatoes are plant-based as long as they aren’t fried, and don’t have oil added to them. Oils are processed and are not plant-based.

Why am I always hungry on a plant-based diet? What’s so fantastic about plant-based diets is that you can eat a lot of food and still lose weight. If your fat intake is low on a plant-based diet, which it should be, for maximum health, use large plates and large bowls because plant foods are very low in calories. You’ll need to eat larger portions on a plant-based diet so you’re not hungry all the time.

Plants are considered nutrient-dense because they are low in calories and contain the majority of the nutrients you need. You’ll want to add a B12 supplement, or an enriched nutritional yeast if you are vegan. You may also need vitamins D3, calcium, and iron, depending on how well your body absorbs nutrients, and based on how many calories you consume daily.

P.S. This is my 877th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

Afrezza inhalable insulin side effects (coughing & wheezing, trouble breathing)

(if you are viewing this on email or on social media, please visit site at http://www.realdiethelp.com for the most updated version of this post; it looks better, and it shows me an accurate count of views)

After weeks of fighting with my insurance company and getting HHS Managed Care involved, I got the inhalable insulin, Afrezza, my doctor prescribed, approved. I was looking forward to trying this new formulation of insulin because the injectable insulins were causing swelling and burning in my fingers and toes, even though I injected the medication into the small amount of fat in my hips. The injectable insulins were also causing severe neuropathy. My circulation got so bad that certain fingers and toes turned gray, which could have led to an ER visit and amputation.

(To watch a video on this topic instead of reading this post, scroll to the bottom of this page to play the YouTube video below that I created to show how to remove the cap on the insulin inhaler, how to insert the insulin powder cartridges into the inhaler, how swollen my fingers and toes looked like when I was taking injectable insulin, why I tried Afrezza, and what my short-term, immediate side effects were while taking Afrezza inhalable insulin).

the box Afrezza comes packaged in

I picked up the prescription the afternoon it came in, but I waited until the next day to try it, just in case I had a severe reaction. If Afrezza made me severely ill, I’d rather go to the doctor in the morning than end up waiting in the emergency room with a bunch of sick people in the evening.

Afrezza causes lung damage

The next morning, my blood sugar was 87, an excellent glucose reading, even for a non-diabetic. Before I took the first dose of inhaled insulin, I ate my first hearty carb meal in over three months. I ate a half of a sweet potato topped with ¼ cup of black beans with some diced red onions. I also ate one dark red cherry, ½ ounce of raw walnuts, three stalks of celery, ¼ cup of TVP soy protein sprinkled with pumpkin pie spice with a tiny amount of monk fruit.  I estimated the total carbs to be around 55 grams.

Afrezza insulin inhaler with cap

I took the powder insulin out of the refrigerator to let it warm up to room temperature for at least 10 minutes as recommended by the manufacturer. Inhaling cold powder is more likely to lead to coughing. After letting the insulin sit out on my kitchen counter for 20 minutes, which should have been sufficient time for it to warm up, I inhaled three of the cartridges, which is their recommended one-dose. Immediately I started coughing, but that wasn’t the worst part. I could not breathe normally or take in full breaths. I started to wheeze, which turned into a mild asthma attack. It took 15-minutes before I was able to breathe optimally again.

type-1 diabetes common side effects

My blood sugar reading, three hours later, was 88. The inhalable insulin seemed to be working well, and the three cartridges appeared to cover approximately 60 grams of carbs for me.

each 1-month supply comes with 2 inhalers

Even though I ended up coughing, wheezing and had trouble breathing for a short period of time this morning after inhaling Afrezza, I thought my body may just needed to acclimate to the new medicine, so I gave it a second go. I took the 4-unit dose of the three cartridges. The same side effects occurred: coughing, wheezing and difficulty breathing for 15-minutes.

A one-month supply comes with three packages of powders. The 4-unit option is what doctors typically prescribe first, since that’s the lowest dose available

My next meal, lunch, consisted of a smoothie. I put a ripe banana in a blender cup with ice, water, 1 teaspoon of ground flax seeds, 2 teaspoons of ground chia seeds, ½ teaspoon of cinnamon, blended it, and topped it with cacao nibs. It was delicious! I haven’t had a whole banana in four months. I couldn’t believe how sweet the banana was. Since I was eating such a small amount of fruit because I was off insulin, my taste buds adjusted and fruit tasted like a delicious dessert, it was divine! I ate a spinach salad in between sips of my banana-cinnamon-chocolate drink, to blunt rising blood sugars.

A few hours later, I started feeling light-headed, shaky, dizzy, and had trouble concentrating. My blood sugar was low at 60. If my blood sugar dips below 80, I can’t function properly. Since I haven’t taking any insulin in over two months, I’ve been on a low-carb, high-fat diet, my blood sugars stayed fairly level, and never went too low. With synthetic insulin in my body, I forgot how awful hypoglycemia feels.

Three of these Afrezza cartridges deliver 4 units of powdered insulin

To correct my blood sugar, and because it was time to eat an early dinner, I ate 1 large apple, 1 small kiwi, 1 small tangerine, ½ medium sweet potato with ¼ cup of black beans. I didn’t know if my blood sugar was going to dip down further, so I made the mistake of taking only 1 of the cartridges.

To deliver 4-units of powder insulin, you need to insert 3 cartridges, one at a time, which means, you’ll have to inhale the powder three separate times

A few hours later, my blood sugar was high at 200. I inhaled two of the insulin cartridges to bring my blood sugar back down. I was hungry so I ate two ounces of pecans, 1 tablespoon of salted roasted pepitas, a large bowl of broccoli and cauliflower soup with ¼ tsp of Umboshi salt seasoning. I was still hungry, so I ate some more TVP with pumpkin spice mixed with a sprinkle of monk fruit zero calorie sweetener. 

Before I went to bed, my blood sugar went down to 127. By the end of the day, I ate just under 1600 calories and consumed 135 net grams of carbohydrates, 72 grams of protein and 67 grams of fat (the pecans tipped me over my fat quota).

As I laid down to sleep at night, I had difficulty breathing again. I raised my head with another pillow, hoping that would allow me to breathe easier, but it didn’t. It took one hour to breathe normally again, and only then was I able to fall asleep, but I woke up several times during the night with my heart beating erratically and felt like I was having multiple panic attacks. It was a frightening and horrible feeling.

Afrezza makes it harder to breathe and causes asthma attacks

People with certain conditions are advised against taking inhalable insulin, such as people with chronic asthma. Per the Afrezza package insert, “Afrezza is contraindicated in patients with the following: “…chronic lung disease such as asthma…” or COPD because of the risk of breathing problems.  

people with asthma or COPD should not take Afrezza

I’ve had asthma attacks in the past, but those asthmatic episodes occurred in very specific circumstances: if I was in a coffee shop and someone was frothing milk (I have a severe dairy allergy), if someone puts butter in a pan and the particles float into the air and I breathe in that contaminated air (butter is a dairy product), or when the air outside is of poor quality (due to a fire, or a lot of pollen). I also get asthma attacks when exposed to dust, or when I am in the same room as Asian cats (I’m allergic to their dander).

I thought it might be okay for me to try Afrezza because I mistakenly thought “chronic” meant that I get asthma attacks all the time. According to Medicine.net, when I looked up the definition of chronic, it read: “In medicine, lasting a long time. A chronic condition is one that lasts 3 months or more (1).”

Miriam Webster defines chronic as “continuing for a long time or returning often, a chronic disease. 2 : happening or done frequently…” (5). 

Based on my medical history of many asthma attacks throughout my life, and the above definitions of chronic, I was never a candidate for inhalable insulin. My doctor should have looked at my records and told me that I cannot take this medication. This is the same doctor that prescribed my asthma medication!

I sent my doctor a message that read: The Afrezza inhalable insulin caused coughing, wheezing, and trouble breathing from fifteen minutes, and up to an hour. My heart rate went up at various times during the night, which felt like I was having multiple panic attacks. This medication is not a viable insulin option for me.

On the Afrezza printout it lists the some of the side effects as: weight gain, hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), diabetic ketoacidosis, anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic reaction), hypokalemia, fluid retention and heath failure with while taking TZDs, coughing, throat pain, throat irritation, headache, diarrhea, fatigue, nausea, bronchitis, urinary tract infection, and bronchospasm (making it hard to breathe). In addition, the insert warns, “Afrezza causes a decline in lung function over time.”

type 2 diabetes common side effects

Afrezza states that type-1 diabetics still need to take their long-acting insulin, but this is not the case for everyone (5). Some people, like myself, can manage diabetes without long-acting (basal) insulin even when eating carbohydrate-rich meals. I was able to keep my blood sugars levels more stable when I stopped taking basal insulin because the background insulin caused my blood sugar levels to go too low.

If you look at the ingredient list, you’ll see polysorbate 80. This added ingredient damages the kidneys and liver, and reduces the good bacteria in your body, which means it will make it harder for your body to protect itself from disease and infections, and heal itself.

ingredient list of Afrezza insulin inhaler medication

 “Polysorbate 80 has been associated with a number of adverse events. In food, small concentrations of undigested polysorbate 80 may enhance bacterial translocation across intestinal epithelia, a potential explanation for an observed increase in the incidence of Crohn’s disease [34]. In drug formulations, polysorbate 80 has been implicated in a number of systemic reactions (e.g., hypersensitivity, nonallergic anaphylaxis, rash) and injection- and infusion-site adverse events (ISAEs; e.g., pain, erythema, thrombophlebitis) [33537]. Polysorbate 80 has also been implicated in cases of renal and liver toxicity.”  (2).

Per the FDA, polysorbate 80 is also in a lot of foods: ice cream and many frozen desserts, pickles, vaccines, certain vitamins, canned green beans, oils, gelatin products, cottage cheese, coloring in BBQ sauce, in the water to remove the feathers from chicken and turkey and duck (3).

Per the USDA, “most common food preservatives like sodium benzoate, or polysorbate 60 and 80 are prohibited by the organic standards” (4).

If you want to limit harmful substances like polysorbate 80, choose “certified organic,” whenever possible.

As of right now, I have no insulin medication options. The injectable insulins on the market today cause me to have neuropathy, severe burning pain and swelling in my fingers and toes resulting in erythromelalgia and Raynaud’s disease. The only available inhalable insulin, Afrezza, causes multiple asthma attacks.

I’ve been managing my blood sugar with a low-carb, high-fat, plant-based vegan diet, combined with lots of exercise, but my insulin resistance seems to be getting worse, because even if I eat boiled broccoli and cauliflower, my blood sugar goes up. If I eat a few blueberries, I have to do a cardiovascular workout for at least 15 minutes.

High fat diets, even if the fat is coming from almonds, increases insulin resistance because the cells are using fat for energy. Since the cells are full with fat, any glucose is going to have trouble entering those cells, so I’ve reduced my daily fat intake from 90% to 15%, and am slowing adding more carbs from fruit, beans, and potatoes. Since I’ve reduced my fat intake, which has lowered the calories I’m consuming, I’ve lost a few pounds, which isn’t good for me, because now, I’m underweight, but my insulin sensitivity is improving, and gaining weight is easy for me to do.

If I can get my carbohydrate total to 300 grams a day, with no more than 90 minutes of exercise by the end of the day, with good glucose control, I’ll let you know what I did and how I did it.

Maybe it’s a good thing that I’m off insulin altogether; maybe my immune system will finally be able to heal itself since I’m no longer dumping chemicals and harmful animal saturated fats inside my body since I eat an oil-free, whole-food, certified organic plant-based vegan diet.

Play the YouTube video below that I created to show how to remove the cap on the insulin inhaler, how to insert the insulin powder cartridges into the inhaler, how swollen my fingers and toes looked like when I was taking injectable insulin, why I tried Afrezza, and what my short-term, immediate side effects were while taking Afrezza inhalable insulin.

P.S. This is my 875th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

Sources:

  1. “Definition of Chronic.” Medicine.net. (2021, March 29). https://www.medicinenet.com/chronic/definition.htm
  2. Schwartzberg, Lee and Navari, Rudolph. “Safety of Polysorbate 80 in the Oncology Setting.” (2018, May 23). National Institutes of Health. US Library of Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6015121/
  3.  “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 – FDA” (2020, April 1). US Dept of Health and Human Services. FDA US Food and Drug Administration. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/cfrsearch.cfm?fr=172.840
  4. What should I know about using salt and preservatives in organic food? US Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service. https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/7%20Salt%20and%20Preservatives%20FINAL%20RGK%20V2.pdf
  5. “Chronic.” Miriam-Webster. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chronic
  6. Afressa. “FAQs – AfrezzaAssist – Your Questions Answered: Afrezza FAQs” (2021, April 23) https://afrezza.com/faqs/

Additional source:

“Organic: the original clean food” EWG. (2019, March 5). https://www.ewg.org/research/packagedorganic/

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