Surprising Diet Facts

side plank with leg raise
There are so many different diets, each one claiming they know the secrets to weight loss, it’s hard to decipher fact from fiction. Here are the facts:

High protein diets are typically high in fat, lower in calories, and easier to follow since they are more satisfying and people lose weight faster, but the side effects are being tired, short-tempered, and dehydrated due to fluid and electrolyte losses. (1) Pg. 178

High protein diets are potentially dangerous since they can cause renal damage (injury to the kidney), increase risk for heart disease, and cause dehydration. (1) pg. 125 & 127

Athletes should never be on diets like Atkins since carbohydrates are too low. (1) pg. 177

Severe dieting causes loss of muscle and a lowered resting metabolic rate commonly referred to as RMR. A simplified explanation of RMR is the number of calories burned when just sitting around, sleeping and eating. You want your RMR as high as possible. Severe dieting means fewer calories burned, and extreme dieting does not increase fat loss. This effect of lowered RMR is compounded when heavy physical activity is combined with dieting. (1) Pg. 354

Some people will do anything to lose weight, like starving themselves, regardless of the consequences, i.e.: malnutrition, bone loss and/or death. Starvation weight-loss diets are those with only about 200 calories a day. Calories will need to be added back slowly since fat can accumulate quickly with few added calories. (1) pg. 176.

On diets with 800 or fewer calories a day, you will lose weight due to muscles and organs shrinking. If you continue on this path, eventually you’ll die. (1) Pg 176

Diets that range from 1000-1500 calories per day, such as Jenny Craig and Slim Fast, are safe and can result in weight loss but they’re too low in calories for most people, especially for those who exercise. These diets are not successful for those who are physically active or for those with small weight loss goals. (1) Pg. 177

Don’t drink sports beverages if you’re trying to lose weight. (1) Pg. 259

Source:
1. Sport Nutrition for Health and Performance, 2nd edition by Manore, Meyer and Thompson

Photo: Me doing a side plank with a leg raise. This is a really tough pose to hold!

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