Pfizer vaccine side effects (Raynaud’s, EM, diabetes, asthma)

I’ve been fully vaccinated about 3 weeks now, but I put off getting the COVID-19 vaccine a few weeks because I was worried about side effects due to the fact that I have multiple comorbidities. I have severe food allergies, diabetes, diabetic neuropathy, erythromelalgia, Raynaud’s, scoliosis, and chronic asthma. (If you’d rather watch the video I created on this topic, scroll to the bottom of this post).

pen insulin for diabetics

I was diagnosed with Type 1.5 diabetes about 14 years ago, so I was worried about high blood sugars. Other diabetics reported erratic blood sugar levels and said their blood sugar levels were “all over the place.” From the time I got the 1st and 2nd shots, and two weeks afterwards, my blood sugars never got low or crazy high.

diabetics can get better blood sugars with whole carbs like potatoes on a low-fat diet

I don’t know if the vaccine affected my blood sugars at all, because I started eating more carbs, like potatoes. I have been checking my blood sugars in the morning, and it only went up about 30 points so it could have been due to the vaccine, or due to the additional carbohydrate intake. So, I’d say that the two Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine shots did not affect my blood sugars even though I’m a diabetic.

I have peripheral diabetic neuropathy, but didn’t get any pain in my fingers or toes. Some people report numbness from neuropathy, but I’ve never had that sensation. The two Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine shots did not make my neuropathy any worse.

My fingers didn’t swell even though I’ve had EM and have Raynaud’s

I also have been diagnosed with EM, erythromelalgia, and Raynaud’s, so I was concerned about burning and swelling in my fingers and does, but I didn’t get any flare-ups after getting the two shots of the Pfizer vaccine.

I also have asthma so I was worried about triggering asthma attacks from the COVID-19 vaccine, but I did not have any breathing problems with either of the Pfizer shots.

My side effects from Pfizer

While I did not get any of the side effects I was concerned about, I did have some side effects. The day after I got the Pfizer vaccine, my arm hurt where I had the shot. It didn’t hurt too bad. My arm hurt for two days, yet I was still able to do arm exercises and my typical workouts.

The day after I received my second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, my arm hurt more and it hurt for three days instead of two. I also had upper and lower back pain, which could be classified as muscle pain. I didn’t have much energy, yet I did complete three separate 30-minute workouts, just not as hard as I usually go.

I felt fatigued, like I had a mild flu the day after the second shot. I was also cranky (LOL). The next day, I was back to my energetic self, so my fears that I would have worse side effects because I have diabetes, diabetic neuropathy, EM, Raynaud’s, were unfounded.

If you’re concerned about the side effects from any of the COVID-19 vaccines, you should be more concerned about the side effects from getting COVID-19. Go online, you will find blogs, Facebook groups, and videos from people who got infected with the COVID-19 virus, who had mild reactions or none, but now have serious side effects, months after they were infected. These people identify themselves long-haulers, age is irrelevant, young people are affected too. Side effects range from person-to-person and can be anything one considers unpleasant.

A woman I know who had tons of energy, and had a full-time job that involved lots of walking to inspect the factory, got infected with COVID-19, and now she’s on disability and using a cane to walk, she’s in her 30’s.

A young man I was chatting on the phone with at work has been an athlete his whole life, he’s lean and muscular, but he contracted COVID-19. Now he can’t play sports, and gets winded getting up from his chair at work to go to the restroom, he’s in his 20’s. We don’t know if long-haulers’ side effects will get better, will get worse, or how long their side effects will last. These people either didn’t get the vaccine, or didn’t have the opportunity to get the vaccine because it wasn’t available when they got infected. We’re lucky we have vaccines now that work, any many of us can choose which one we want to get.

How to protect yourself from COVID-19

The best protection against short and long term side effects from the current novel SARS viruses that keep evolving, is to get a COVID-19 vaccine. I know you’re scared to get the shots, I was scared too, but I was more scared to get COVID-19 and end up hospitalized, on a ventilator, or end up with more medical problems than I already have.

Another way to protect yourself is to get your body stronger, if and when it needs to fight against a virus, flu, injury or infection, by sleeping seven to nine hours a night, exercising at least 30 minutes every day (90 minutes is ideal), drinking plenty of water to prevent dehydration, and eating lots of fruits, vegetables and greens.

What and how much you eat affects your health. Keep your fats low, but make sure to consume some healthy fats like nuts, seeds and avocado. You also want to stay away from alcohol, cigarette smoke, sugar, dairy, oils, and animal products.

Stress takes a toll on our immune system, so do what you can to calm down when anger or fear strikes. The last 15 months have been really stressful on all of us. Some extra kindness and forgiveness towards others will make you feel better too.

Let’s get rid of this virus for once and for all. The more people who get vaccinated, the less it will grow and replicate.

Cardio HIIT abs (all-in-one)

I combined an intense cardio HIIT session with an ab workout, into a quick 20-minute routine. Scroll down to start the YouTube workout now.

Your abs, core, heart, low back and shoulders are getting strengthening moves in this follow-along video.  We go from standing exercises to floor exercises, because when you go up and down off the floor, it’s harder and more cardiovascular, so you’re burning more calories.

I’ve chosen exercises that are gentler for those that have weaker abs and/or low-back pain.

If you have knee pain, or knee issues, keep feet on the ground during the jumping exercises.

There are 16 different exercises, all performed for 30 seconds. I’ve also included a warm-up and stretches at the end.

Here is the list of (cardio-abs) cardio and abdominal exercises, in order:

  1. Standing alternating knee lifts with circle-eight arms (warm-up)
  2. Plank with alternating hand taps to the front of the hips, with hand taps to the side hips/side butt
  3. Wacky jacks
  4. Bear crawl
  5. Front kicks with a flexed foot
  6. Plank with alternating toe taps
  7. Jump rope
  8. Rocking plank
  9. Fast feet
  10. Mountain climbers
  11. Standing ab crunches
  12. Side plank with elbow to knee
  13. 2 alternating repeater knees
  14. Elbow side plank with an oblique twist by bringing the elbow towards the floor
  15. Bird-dog
  16. Prone leg lifts, singles, then doubles

Stand and stretch

Is the Mastering Diabetes program worth it?

Mastering Diabetes is an educational book which explains why people become diabetic and why a low-fat plant-based diet is the diet plan to reverse Type II diabetes, and better manage Type-1 diabetes. It’s a vegan diet program that discourages processed foods, and restricts protein and fats to 10% of calories.

Mastering Diabetes is also a coaching program that offers different types of coaching plans for those that need additional help and to answer personal questions.

fruit in large quantities is encouraged on the Mastering Diabetes program
Photo by Jane D. on Pexels.com

Signature Group Coaching Program:

The least expensive program is $99 a month, includes access to their Facebook community, some videos, and two group zoom meetings a month. There are a little over one thousand members on their Facebook group at this time, so it’s a small community, and if members post questions on their private Facebook page, most questions get answered within 24 hours.

tofu, potatoes, onions, and olives are permitted on the Mastering Diabetes program, but tofu & olives should only be eaten in small amounts because they are high in fat

The twice a month zoom calls are held on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of every month and last about 90 minutes. Members can write questions during the meetings and/or get answers to their questions live in a chat while other members are watching and listening in. Since there aren’t that many members attending the zoom meetings (at this time), everyone has the opportunity to get their questions answered. This alone may make the $99 fee worth the price, but the $99 fee comes with a three-month minimum obligation, so it’s really $297 for three months.

fish is discouraged on the Mastering Diabetes program since it’s not vegan and is high in fat

You can cancel the membership and get a refund (depending on when you signed up) if you complete their decision trees and upload them, 14 consecutive days in a row. The decision trees are worksheets that you complete. You write down every piece of food you eat, what exercises you did, and list your blood sugar readings. You also need to calculate your carbs and fat for each meal, and the total fat and carbs in grams, each day on each worksheet. To get these calculations, they recommend using the chronometer app. While doing these tasks takes extra time and work, filling out the decision trees and using an app, are extremely beneficial in helping members see for themselves how many calories, carbs and fat grams they eat.

coconut is discouraged on the Mastering Diabetes program, since it is high in fat

Within 24 hours of posting a decision tree on the Facebook group, a coach reads the decision tree and offers snippets of “helpful tips” on how to modify the members’ food choices according to the plan. If someone has read the Mastering Diabetes book in its entirety, it’s very clear what’s allowed and not allowed on the program, so some of the advice from the coaches is redundant for those that have watched the videos and have read the Mastering Diabetes book.

sugar is discouraged on the Mastering Diabetes program

The downsides to the least expensive coaching program of $99 a month is that not all questions get answered if you post your questions on their private Facebook group, it has a very sales-focused aspect to it, by pushing members to upgrade to see other videos and get more personalized assistance.

While the coaches are well-versed in the program, they are not doctors, and have given false information to members about nutrition. For instance, one coach said that omega 6 fats are not needed (they are, but in small amounts which you can get from walnuts and other plants), that fats have 10 calories per gram, it’s 9 calories; that insurance covers consultations from doctors from Plant Based Telehealth, they don’t accept insurance, and that we can get a free consultation with one of the doctors from Plant Based Telehealth if you ask, they don’t, consultations range from $150-$200 for 30 minutes. While this untrue information is minor in that it probably wouldn’t hurt anyone, I wonder what other incorrect information they tell people. It’s perfectly fine if the coaches don’t know the answer; it’s not okay to guess.

Mastering Diabetes is a high carbohydrate diet, but the carbs should come from whole foods,
not processed foods like pasta or pizza

Mastering Diabetes pressures it’s members to eat a low protein diet even though there is no evidence that protein from plants need to be no more than 10% of one’s total calorie intake to manage diabetes. It’s common to see negative remarks from coaches “reminding” members not to eat protein powder since it’s a processed food, yet adding a vegan protein powder to one’s diet is recommended by doctors like Dr. Gregor, when people have trouble consuming enough protein or calories, which is common on this plan since fat intake is greatly restricted to a maximum of 20 grams per day. When you cut fat intake from nuts and nut butters, you’re greatly reducing calories and protein.

protein powder is discouraged on the Mastering Diabetes program because it’s processed and high in protein

They also heavily promote their amla tea powder, which has mixed reviews on Amazon. Some people don’t like the taste and others have complained about the consistency. One of the coaches said that amla powder needs to be taken consistently to build up in the body, and that it can take three months to see lower blood sugar numbers. He said people can see blood sugars go down by as much as 30 points, but if someone has blood sugars that are 100 points over what it normal while fasting, then an amla supplement doesn’t seem all that beneficial.

oils are discouraged on the Mastering Diabetes program because it is a low-fat diet & excess fat causes insulin resistance (high blood sugars)

Every few weeks, as a member, you get access to new videos, but you cannot view all of them on the portal. You have to pay the higher monthly fee for these other videos that appear to contain new and better information. In my option, these videos should be accessible to all monthly memberships. The difference between the coaching programs should be the individualized attention, not limited information to helpful advice on how to manage their disease. This is where it feels like the salesman is in your face, and all he cares about is your money.

dairy is discouraged on the Mastering Diabetes program because it’s high in fat & protein

Small Group Coaching Program

This program is $249 a month has weekly zoom meetings, so you get twice as many chances to get your questions answered, plus the benefits from the $99 plan, with access to more videos.

Private Coaching Program

This program is $599 a month, where you get a private coach who you can speak to 30 minutes every week, plus the benefits from the $99 plan, with access to more videos.

Private Coaching with the Founder.

If you want a private coaching session with Cyrus Khambatta, who has a Phd in Nutritional Biochemistry from Berkeley, the cost is:

  • $1500 per month
  • $750 for 60 minutes
  • $375 for 30 minutes

Based on those exorbitant prices, it appears as if Cyrus doesn’t want to coach people one-on-one. He’s promoting his book, advocating his online coaching programs, doing interviews, and creating YouTube videos so he’s probably very busy and doesn’t have much time left to coach.

exercise is recommended to manage blood sugars on the Mastering Diabetes program

Is the Managing Diabetes program worth it?

The answer to this question really depends on what someone expects to get out of this program and in what timeframe.

If you need specific answers related to diabetes, then it’s a great resource for a fee. If you want people to support you with weight loss, eating healthier, staying motivated, and feel like you are a part of a group of people like you, it’s really helpful.

If you expect to get your diabetes reversed in 30 days or 90 days without attending the meetings, watching the videos, posting your decision trees, and following the protocol ninety percent of the time, it’s not for you. To get results from any program designed to help you lose weight and improve your health, you have to put in the time and effort.

The high carb vegan diet from Mastering Diabetes is definitely doable if you put in the effort

The managing diabetes program frequently reminds you to pay more to upgrade, which is an annoying tactic that’s a turnoff and leaves a bad taste in your mouth. When you’re trying to help people with their health, provide them with all the information that you have available, not some of it. While there are issues that can easily be fixed on the Managing Diabetes program and platforms, it can still help diabetics who need help losing weight, reducing salt and cholesterol intake, and getting their blood sugars under control.

If cost is an issue, buy the book, read it from cover to cover, and refer back to it every so often. Follow their advice and make the recipes included in the book. If you need more help, try the $99 a month plan. If that plan isn’t working, you can upgrade. If you don’t feel the program is working for you, give it at least three months and follow their guidelines. You cannot expect to see significant changes unless you are making significant adjustments to your lifestyle.  

fun & funky cardio high intensity workout (7 min HIIT training)

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Exercise can and should be fun, so I took it up 1000 notches and created a car themed high intensity cardio workout with easy-to-follow dance moves. Each exercise is performed for 30 seconds. This fun and funky workout will get your heart rate up and make you laugh, at the same time. If you have knee pain or problems, keep your feet on the ground.

Below is a list of the HIIT exercises in this 7-minute cardiovascular workout, in order:

1. trucker driver: shake hips while turning the steering wheel

2. sunroof dancing: as if you’re standing in a limo on prom night

3. honk the horn with two side-steps

4. low rider: curtsy lunge pulses

5. windshield wipers: bunny hops with hands in the air

6 stick shift: step forward and back with arm moving forward & back

7. put on your seatbelt: bring arm up and across the body

8. roll down both windows: imaginary jump rope

9. back up the car: hop backwards in a square

10. wax on, wax off: up & down squats with rotating hands

11. near miss: chest press with leg lifts

12. push the car: running man dance with chest press

13. roadside assistance: jumping jacks

14. fast feet

At the end of the video, my husband shows up as the tow truck and whisks me away.

 

P.S. This is my 885th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

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Push-Pull-Press beginner workout

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If you’re wondering what the heck is a push-pull-press workout, you’re not the only one. Any exercise where you push something away, whether it’s the floor or a weight, that’s a push exercise.

shoulder press (press exercise)

Examples of push exercises include push-ups, squats, upward dog, cobra pose, calf raises, and leg presses. Squats are often listed under the “legs” category.

A press exercise is usually where you are pressing overhead, like a shoulder press with dumbbells or a barbell, but sometimes press and push exercises are considered the same thing.

A pull exercise is where you are pulling a weight, a cable or a band towards you or upwards. Examples of pull exercises are pull-ups, band pull-aparts, lat pull-downs, upright rows, rope pull-downs, flyes, lateral raises (shoulder), deadlifts, seated rows, and bent-over rows. Deadlifts are sometimes listed under the “legs” category (ie: push-pull-legs).

goblet squat (legs/push exercise)

In this push-pull-press beginner weightlifting workout, we do one set of six exercises, which include goblet squats, which are easier for beginners to master, shoulder press with dumbbells, double-leg deadlifts with a kettlebell or dumbbells, bent-over rows with a dumbbell or kettlebell, and end the strength section with calf raises.

push-ups (this is a press/push exercise)

Beginners should always start with one set of exercises. People who are more experienced should do two sets. Advanced lifters should do three or four sets of exercises.

double-leg kettlebell deadlift (this is a legs/pulling exercise)

You’ll want two sets of dumbbells for this 20 minute workout, and if you have a kettlebell, grab that too.

Don’t worry if you are brand new to lifting or exercise, I go over form and show different variations, depending on what level your are at, so you can pick the one that best suits you.

Here are the exercises in order:

1. warm-up with side steps

2. push-ups to failure

3. goblet squats

4. shoulder press

5. kettlebell deadlifts

6. rows

7. 3-way calf raises

end with stretches

Press the play button on the 20 minute YouTube video below to start this fun and funny workout (my husband incorporates dance moves and laughable expressions behind my back, in between sets).

P.S. This is my 878th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

side butt butt workout (gluteus medius) to get rid of hip dips

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This side butt workout is designed to strengthen the glute medius and reduce the appearance of hip dips, where there is an indentation on your hips.

All you need for this workout is a mat and a glute band, what I refer to as a “booty band.”

Here are the exercises that target the hips/side-butt, in order:

  • 20 side steps (this your warmup)
  • 10 mini squats with side leg lifts
  • 10 hip cleaners
  • 10 leg lifts to the back at a 45-degree angle, each side
  • 10 clamshells, each side
  • 10 side-lying hip raises with a kick, each side
  • 10 seated banded hip abduction
  • 10 side-lying leg raises, toe up, each side
  • 10 supine banded hip abductions
  • End with a glute stretch

The appearance of hip dips is largely determined by your anatomy, your genes, but you can add volume to that area by adding muscle and/or fat. You can add exercises that strengthen the glute medius (what people sometimes refer to the side butt) to build muscle onto your gluteus medius (although, you’re most likely adding muscle to all areas of your glutes since exercise works multiple muscles).

The thinner you are, the more likely you’ll see hip dips, but the good news is that most guys don’t even notice hip dips. Just focus on getting stronger and being the healthiest you can.

One way to improve your health and reduce excess bodyfat, is to reduce saturated fat intake by limiting or eliminating dairy, meat, chicken, fish and oils. If that’s something you’re interested in, stay tuned for the 2nd edition of my book The High-Five Diet, coming soon.

Click the play button on the YouTube video below to start the 15 minute workout.

P.S. This is my 883rd blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

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Shoulder Mobility Workout (frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis/rehab)

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This shoulder mobility workout is to help you regain range of motion and strength. You can use these 12 exercises for rehabilitation for frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis too. You’ll need light dumbbells and a light TheraBand. This complete workout takes only 30 minutes.

plank works shoulders and core

Your goal is to perform 3 sets of 15 reps, three times a week, taking a day off between each shoulder workout session. Stop at the first sign of pain. The mantras “feel the burn,” and “no pain, no gain” don’t apply when you’re injured, or are rehabbing from an injury. Doing too much too soon, can backfire, especially when it comes to shoulder exercises and stretches.

Here are the shoulder rehab and strength exercises in this workout, in order:

  1. Shoulder rolls (this is the warm-up)
  2. Rows to work the upper back muscles (no equipment needed)
  3. Front raise
  4. Imaginary rope pull-down
  5. TheraBand Chest press
  6. TheraBand pull-aparts
  7. scarecrows
  8. external rotations (use a band or weights)
  9. tap back of each hand against the lower back, hips or glutes (this is an internal shoulder mobility exercise)
  10. lateral raise with a large band on trap (You only need to add the band if your trap raises and takes over. You can order this same blue band from NT Loop from http://www.ntloop.com/shop/ )
  11. pec stretch
  12. plank hold (this works the core and your shoulders
    • other options:
    • plank with shoulder taps
    • quadruped with shoulder taps
    • plank, go on all fours (quadruped position) for scapular presses and/or scapular rotations

Start your rehab now, by pressing play on the YouTube videos below (scroll down to see the other videos and my tip for comfortable sleeping):

Another exercise that you may want to try when your shoulders get a little bit stronger are ball-walkouts. You’ll need a Swiss Ball to do these. This is one of the exercises my coach had me perform to rehabilitate my shoulders:

This is a short video on how to use a foam roller and a yoga therapy ball (you can use a tennis ball too) to get rid of knots, release tight fascia, and increase shoulder mobility

This is another short video for some extra shoulder stretches:

How to sleep with a frozen shoulder:

Try to sleep on your back with a special pillow that has a hole in the middle so that your chin isn’t dipping down and putting your cervical spine in an awkward position. You don’t want to sleep on the side of your injured shoulder because that will intensify the pain. You also don’t want to sleep on the side that’s not injured because that shoulder will have too much pressure on it, and your good shoulder may end up hurting too. Another reason why you don’t want to sleep on just one side is that your face will be compressed, and, over time, one side of your face will age quicker than the other, because the side of your face that’s on the pillow will be wrinkled and pulled.

P.S. This is my 878th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

Hip thrust workout (full butt workout)

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If you want to burn more calories, stop back aches, get rid of hip pain, and have a better looking physique, exercising your glutes (the side butt and glute max), is a quick and easy fix. A ten-to-fifteen minute workout, two to three times a week is sufficient to get your glutes strong and functional.

I’ve included eight glute exercises that take no more than 10 minutes to complete below. You can follow me in the YouTube video in this blog post, or do them on your own from the written workout provided.

In this hip thrust workout, we are working the gluteus maximus and the gluteus medius, what some people refer to as the side butt, by adding a resistance band to some of the exercises.

For this workout, you can use a soft foam roller like I’m using, a Bosu ball, or your couch to elevate your upper body. If you have a resistance band, grab that too.

Here are the exercises in this workout, in order:

  • 10 upright kneeling hip thrusts
  • 10 banded hip thrusts
banded hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 20 B-stance hip thrusts
B-stance hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 20 single leg hip thrusts
single leg hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 10 alternating marches
  • 10 banded hip thrusts, with a pause at the top
hip thrust on a foam roller
  • 10 banded quick hip thrusts
  • 10 banded hip thrusts with a 10 second hold on the last rep

End with a 30-second glute stretch. If you have a foam roller, use the roller to add pressure to the hips, and any place that feels tight or knotted. Make sure not to foam roll over joints, your neck or your low back.

If you followed along with me, you did over 100 hip thrusts, great job!

Play the 10-minute hip thrust workout below to strengthen those glutes today:

P.S. This is my 880th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

100 Hip Thrust Workout (8 variations)

  1. 10 upright kneeling hip thrusts
  2. 10 banded hip thrusts
  3. 20 B-stance hip thrusts
  4. 20 single leg hip thrusts
  5. 10 alternating marches
  6. 10 banded hip thrusts, with a pause at the top
  7. 10 banded quick hip thrusts
  8. 10 banded hip thrusts with a 10 second hold on the last rep

how to get motivated to exercise (15 motivating tips)

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Getting motivated to exercise, starts before you go for a walk or lift weights.

Motivation stems from planning, being positive, acknowledging the benefits of the exercises you plan to do and that you’re not going to be perfect at every one of them.

By telling yourself that you’re going to give your next workout your best, that you may not like all of the exercises, but that you’ll have fun doing the ones you do enjoy, will help motivate you to start and complete the workout.

Going to bed a little earlier to get a little more sleep may be all that’s needed for that energy boost.

If you feel exhausted daily, start with a walk. Sometimes exercise will give you the energy you need, because moving around feels invigorating.

What foods you eat, and what drinks you consume, also factor into whether you’ll feel up to exercising.

Drinking alcoholic beverages the previous day will definitely tax your energy level and will make you feel like sleeping instead of moving.

If you eat a heavy meal before exercise, you’re not going to want to jump up and down, or do abdominal work. If your body requires to you to eat before exercising, choose something light, such as a fruit smoothie, or some fruit.

Fruit is an excellent pre-workout food because it’s low in calories, won’t upset your stomach, and the healthy carbs from fruit will give you an immediate source of glucose your muscles need.

Photo by Jane D. on Pexels.com

Simple things like putting on a comfortable exercise outfit that makes you feel good and look good, planning your workout in advance by picking the exercises, how many of each exercise you plan to do, putting the days you plan to workout on your calendar, deciding the start and end times of your workouts, choosing your favorite music or creating a playlist, are surefire ways to motivate you so you’re looking forward to exercising.

Top 15 tips to get motivated to exercise

  1. be positive
  2. acknowledge the benefits of exercise you plan to do
  3. understand that you’re not going to be perfect at every exercise
  4. tell yourself that you’re going to give your next workout your best
  5. you may not like all of the exercises, but you’ll love the results
  6. go to bed a little earlier to get a little more sleep
  7. avoid drinking alcoholic beverages the previous day
  8. don’t eat a heavy meal before exercise
  9. eat a light snack, such as a fruit smoothie, or some fruit, pre-workout
  10. put on a comfortable exercise outfit that makes you feel good and look good
  11. plan your workout in advance by picking the exercises
  12. decide in advance, how many of each exercise you plan to do by writing it down
  13. put the days you plan to workout on your calendar
  14. decide the start and end times of your workouts in advance
  15. choose your favorite music or create a playlist

 
Before COVID-19, before the lockdown, I went to the gym every day, not only because I worked there as a personal trainer, or because the gym has a lot more equipment than I do, but because it was fun. I got to speak to other people (and gym rats like me), see what other exercises that they do, and for that extra motivation of being in that loud, energizing environment. I created a video with invigorating music that will create that similar vibe to motivate you while you work out, to help push you a little harder, work out a little longer, lift a little heavier, and to try new exercises.

This video I put together contains over 80 clips of exercises I’ve performed, either at the gym, my yard, or my home gym, with upbeat music. You can walk and watch, or do whatever workout routine you want to the music, while feeling like you’re around, or with your top trainer, or gym buddy in your favorite fitness environment.

Here’s a partial list of the exercises shown in the video:

Play the above video to watch these exercises

 

Handing abdominal exercises

Hip thrusts on a Bosu ball with a single 70-lb dumbbell at Crunch Gym

Walking planks with chains

Single leg hip thrusts on a bench

Barbell overhead shrugs with 40-lbs

Squats with a 100-lb dumbbell (that’s about what I weigh!)

Never-ending squats

Wall-sit with four 35-pound plates totaling 140 pounds

Chest press on a pull-up machine’s foot pedal

Bent-over rows on a bench, back when it was World Gym

Push-ups on kettlebells

Lat pull downs

Side elbow plank while holding a swiss ball in between by feet

Static lunges with a plate under my heel while holding a heavy dumbbell in one hand

Side-leg lifts

Banded clamshells

Mixed grip sumo barbell deadlifts

Kneeling hip thrusts

Banded kickbacks

Heel-elevated goblet squats

Heels-elevated prisoner squats

Heels-elevated overhead squats

Single-leg glute bridge

Alternating, elevated banded glute marches

Kettlebell swings

Kettlebell deadlifts

Single-leg kettlebell deadlifts

Standing quad stretch

Standing hamstring stretch

Jump squats

rolling planks

side plank with hip lifts

swiss ball hamstring curls

foam roller hamstring curls

front and side step-ups

neutral grip pull-ups

pull ups from the floor

front and rear leg elevated lunges

push-ups on yoga blocks

dips on pull-up machine

skater squats

Bulgarian split squats

Lateral raises

Bent-arm lateral raises

Calf raises

Plie squats

Play the YouTube video above so see these exercises done properly with upbeat music.

Let me know what you think

P.S. This is my 879th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

upper body light weights workout (how to tone arms, triceps, biceps, chest & back)

(if you are viewing this on email or on social media, please visit site at http://www.realdiethelp.com for the most updated version of this post; it looks better, and it shows me an accurate count of views)

If you want toned arms, a beautiful chest pump, strong rounded shoulders, and a no-fat back, no amount of cardio will help these areas; what you need is weight training. You don’t need heavy weights to strengthen your muscles, but you do need to challenge your body with twice-weekly weightlifting exercises, to keep your bones and muscles from deteriorating.

I created an upper body workout, where all you need is light weights. This follow-along workout is for all levels (newbies, intermediate and even advanced) because the exercises aren’t complicated, and you pick the weights.

If you’re new to weightlifting, 3-pound and 5-pound weights will suffice, for now.

If you’ve been weightlifting for 6 months consistently, 5-pound and 8-pound weights will work great.

If you’re an experienced weightlifter, have three sets of weights available for different body parts, and for drops sets. You’ll want 8-pound weights, 10-pound weights and 12-pound weights.

Here are the exercises in this workout, in order:

  1. walking warm up with bodyweight chest press and shoulder presses
walking warm-up with bodyweight chest press

2. bridge with dumbbell chest press

bridge with dumbbell chest press

3. kneeling dumbbell rows

4. bridge with dumbbell chest flys

5. dumbbell plank rows

dumbbell plank rows

6. bridge with dumbbell fly and press

7. kneeling dumbbell triceps extensions

8. dumbbell hammer curls & bent-arm lateral raise

9. dumbbell scarecrows

beginning position of dumbbell scarecrows

10. dumbbell shoulder press

kneeling shoulder press

11. dumbbell hammer curl, bent-arm lateral raise, scarecrow, shoulder press combination

12. bird-dog

bird-dog pose

Stretches: triceps stretch, chest stretch, biceps stretch, latissimus stretch

Play the upper body workout below to strengthen your triceps, back, chest, biceps and core muscles.

P.S. This is my 879th blog! I’ve been publishing blog posts on this platform, consistently for over seven years now. I can’t believe it’s been that long. To prevent burnout, and to provide helpful, interesting, educational, unique content, I’ll be posting blogs once a week from now on instead of twice a week.

I don’t make any money on this platform. If you’d like to donate to my page, to cover website fees, click the PayPal link below. Any amount is welcome, no matter how small. Thank you!

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=Z6BNSVHQWH478

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